Noel-less Oasis plods on as “Beady Eye”

17 11 2010

Exit Noel Gallagher and Oasis.  Enter Beady Eye.  The new band is made up of Liam Gallagher, Andy Bell, Gem Archer and Chris Sharrock.

If the new song, “Bring the Light,” is any indication, I think we might soon see just how indispensable Noel is to Oasis.  This song has a decent groove to it, but “Baby come on” repeated over and over and over just doesn’t cut it.

Decide for yourselves.

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Best of Angus

12 11 2010

Growing up I was always an Eddie Van Halen fan, almost to the exclusion of all the other 70’s and 80’s supposed guitar gods.  I was particularly unimpressed, back in those days, with Angus Young.  I found him kind of boring.  I think I measured a guitarist by his ability to solo and I don’t think that’s ever been Angus’s strong suit.

20-something years later, though, I see his work in a different light.  Angus wrote some of the greatest rock guitar riffs ever.  They’re relatively simple in construction, but powerful.  It’s hard to match the sound he get out of his Gibson SG and whatever his rig was.

I’m not terribly familiar with AC/DC’s oldest stuff, nor do I know much about their stuff from the last 10-15 years.  But we all know their “classics.”  Here are my favorite AC/DC guitar songs

  • Hell’s Bells —  There might not be a better opening riff in rock history than in this song.  The bell is classic!
  • Back In Black — To find 10 better hard rock albums than Back in Black would be incredibly difficult, to say the least.  The title track is one of the best songs on one of the best rock albums of all time.
  • Who Made Who — Before AC/DC’s career took something of a dip, they put out this song for the soundtrack of Maximum Overdrive.  Top notch work in both the solo and the intro and outro.
  • Shoot To Thrill — Another song from Back in Black, STS is a 30 year old track that sounds maybe better now than in 1980.  It fit perfectly in the recent Iron Man 2 flick.
  • Highway to Hell — I always found it somewhat haunting that Bon Scott died within months of the song charting.  As a kid, I always shunned this song as overtly evil.  But I’d be lying to say it doesn’t rock!  HtoH features one of the best rifs ever.
  • Dirty Deeds (Done Dirt Cheap) — Simple but powerful aptly describes this tune.  DDDDC is infectious.  It’s a great song to crank and scream down the highway.




The Beatles’ 100 Best Songs, according to me (51-60)

5 11 2010

Continued from

https://soundofthepounding.wordpress.com/2010/10/17/the-beatles%E2%80%99-100-best-songs-according-to-me-41-50/

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51.  It Won’t Be Long — A masterful pop song with the perfect pop ending

52.  She Loves You — Apparently, She Loves You was the biggest selling Beatles single in British history and it was the second song to explode Beatlemania all over the United States.  Paul noted the use of the device of writing from almost a third person perspective.  The audience is the object of another’s love.  The singer’s a messenger.  The Beatles did this type of thing a few times and it’s a nice little twist on the standard pop song.

53.  She Said, She Said — Perhaps to obscure the inspiration for this great bit of psychedelic rock, John changed it from He Said to She Said.  Peter Fonda nearly managed to kill everyone’s buzz one evening in LA, telling John and whoever else that would listen that he knew what it was like to be dead.  John was annoyed by the persistence and morbidity of the message but it obviously triggered something of a creative spark.  I’m awful at talking about time signatures but this song seems to jump around a bit.

54.  Two of Us — In the midst of breaking up, John and Paul managed to put together a handful of performances that still showed there was a tremendous chemistry between them, musically and personally.  While this song is supposed to be about Paul and his then fiance, Linda, most of us fans hear it as a song from Paul to John.  After all, with whom did Paul “have memories longer than the road the stretches out ahead,” Linda or John?  If the song came out today it would be in the “alt country” genre.

55.  Don’t Let Me Down — One of the best things about Let It Be…Naked is the addition of this simple but great track to the Let It Be lineup.  I’d like to know how it never found its way onto Spector’s version of the album, especially considering it originated during the making of the album and was one of the rooftop songs.  You’ll not find a man much more vulnerable than Lennon in this song.

56.  Yellow Submarine — If you can’t find something to like about Yellow Submarine, there is something seriously wrong with you.  Sure it’s a novelty song, but it’s a great one.  It’s creative, catchy, has a lot going on.  It shows that the Beatles could do amazing things when they took their work seriously, even when the song wasn’t serious.  Two thumbs up for Ringo’s vocals.  No one else could’ve sung it in that band.

57.  Old Brown Shoe — Looking at it conventionally, nothing about this song suggests that it is anything but filler.  It’s not a hit but it’s a nice rock song.  The guitar, the drums, the bass, the vocals — all ugly-funky-good!  In fact, it’s one of my favorite McCartney bass tunes.  OBS shows George a capable rock writer.

58.  I Don’t Want to Spoil The Party — I don’t have the energy to verify it, but I seem to recall that John considered this song a throw-away.  That wouldn’t be shocking considering he was pretty tough on his Beatles output.  Still, I think it’s a great bit of country-rock.  It’s another almost alt country bit.  The guitars sound great and the vocals are superb; another example of how great Paul and John sounded singing together.  Guys, if you’re being honest, you will admit to having a moment or two like this in your life. It’s a weep in your beer song.

59.  I’ve Just Seen a Face — It’s surprising how little credit George gets as a guitarist.  Songs like this get overlooked.  It would be too much to credit the Beatles for launching the folk-rock movement, but this song certainly would’ve helped bolster it, help keep music moving in that direction.  Capitol Records put this song on the American Rubber Soul to strengthen the album’s folk rock feel, to take advantage of the money-making bands like the Birds were doing.

60.  She’s Leaving Home — Probably some of Paul’s “granny shit” if you were to ask John, She’s Leaving Home tells a story that maybe spoke more to what was going on in homes in America and Britain than parents would have cared to admit.  It’s soft rebellion.  Don’t despise your parents, just leave.  Do what you want to do.  Not that the Beatles were necessarily advocating that, but the story plays to some of the stereotypes about the so-called “Me Generation.”  As a bit of music, it’s spectacular.  McCartney was not one to regularly sing falsetto, but he nailed it on this track.